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ProChem recently assembled and delivered an Ion-Exchange Pilot System for a new customer. This pilot system will remove nitrates from the customer’s wastewater. This system will be placed at the customer’s site for several weeks to demonstrate how the full scale process will work.

Pilot System Features

  • Skid-mounted and accessible by fork lift or pallet jack
  • Four 14.7″ x 40″ FRP vessels with poly liners
  • 2.5cuft ion-exchange media
  • Distributor system
  • Plumbed using 80PVC and 1″ high purity water braided tubing
  • Polypropylene pre-filter housing (20″)
  • 1/2 HP, 120V booster pump
  • Brine tank for on-site regeneration of ion-exchange media
  • Feed tank and effluent tank (275 gallons each)

Pilot System Images

Before it left our assembly warehouse, our Water Systems team tested the pilot system.

Ion Exchange Pilot System  Columns and Tubing_mountains When Water Matters and valves  Pilot System Switches  

ProChem strives to help their customers establish the highest level of credibility and a positive reputation within the regulatory community. Their goal is to significantly reduce the amount of fresh water that manufacturers require by providing sustainable solutions that will also benefit the customer’s bottom line.

ProChem is not the only industrial wastewater treatment company who is tweeting, posting, writing, and speaking about drought in the United States. Companies who provide products and services that support the treatment and handling of water for industrial facilities hear a call to action during drought.

You may be wondering why that is, under the assumption that big industry has plenty of water to make goods for people; that drought only impacts families who don’t have water to drink or for recreation, right? After all, these state-wide conservation mandates seem to be focused on individual communities and homes. It's true that industrial facilities use a very large amount of water: thousands of gallons per day in order to produce the goods that citizens purchase and consume. When there is a serious drought, as in California and much of the west coast, favoritism is not granted to these corporations. Water conservation quotas apply across the board to industry (high volume users) and households (low volume users). When the average home has trouble getting the volume of water they’re used to for watering their lawns, cooking, and drinking, you can bet that industrial facilities have more difficulty getting the volume of water they need to make products that keep their doors open—and their workers employed. Water is not only essential for life, it’s essential for the economy.

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Wastewater treatment professionals are innovators who develop technology that is meant to lessen a facility’s impact to the environment. In ProChem’s case, it is their water reuse system with I-PRO™, which was developed with conservation and sustainability as the driving force. I-PRO™ allows industrial facilities to recycle their wastewater at a rate of over 90%. Some of ProChem’s customers are achieving 97%+ with their water reuse system. This means that these facilities are consuming a fraction of the water they would without the I-PRO™ system. The less water they consume, the more money they save, which allows them to continue operating and providing their goods, services, and employment to the community. More importantly, during a drought, it means that the water they are not using remains available to the community for use. Industrial wastewater treatment companies like ProChem exist because they care about water quality and sustainability. It’s their business but also their calling. The “water problem” isn’t a new one, but severe drought brings this problem to each of our doorsteps, reminding us that we have to take action. Hundreds of companies are utilizing water reuse systems and taking other water conservation steps. ProChem is proud to provide the wastewater treatment chemistry, equipment, and professional operations services that help industrial facilities contribute to a drought solution in their community.  

ProChem strives to help their customers establish the highest level of credibility and a positive reputation within the regulatory community. Their goal is to significantly reduce the amount of fresh water that manufacturers require by providing sustainable solutions that will also benefit the customer’s bottom line.

Electroplating operations use a lot of water in their processes, and the purer it is, the better. It's used for mixing chemicals and then rinsing the products between plating process steps. It's critical for the rinse water to be clean to prevent cross contamination between processes and for producing clean substrate. A clean active substrate is necessary to prevent delamination of the plated layers.

This point is especially critical for plating operations that use platinum group metals. Their final finishes are expensive, so rejects are very costly to the manufacturer. Additionally, platinum plating operations lose platinum group metals as waste runoff in the rinse and drag out rinse waters in the plating process. Reusing electroplating process wastewater allows the manufacturer to control the quality of each process step. This prevents rejects, saving the manufacturer money. Additionally, a metals recovery system can be easily integrated with a water reuse system so that when the platinum group metals are filtered out of the wastewater, they are actually available for return to the process tank. A separate metals recovery system should be used for each rinse step. For example, the drag out water (the stagnant rinse right after the plating bath) should have its own recovery system. That system should constantly scavenge metals from the stagnant water. The most commonly used methods for platinum recovery systems are:

  • Activated carbon (the platinum group metals are absorbed by the carbon).
  • Selective ion-exchange resin (the platinum group metals are bonded to the resin). This is effective for both rinse and drag out water.
  • A combination of carbon and metal selective resin.
  • Electrowinning (the metals are absorbed into a porous metal cathode). This is best for drag out water.

Integrating metals recovery with water reuse

Water reuse systems have two main treatment protocols:

  1. Purification. For example, lowering the conductivity using ion-exchange resins.
  2. Filtration. For example, reverse osmosis.

To integrate metals recovery into a reuse system, all the wastewater that may contain precious metals must flow through the metals recovery system before flowing through the water purification step in the reuse system. In other words, the whole treatment process looks like this:

Metals Recovery Process  

Directing rinse lines to the water reuse system

Because the drag out water requires periodic dumping through the water reuse system, after it flows through the metals recovery system, it is collected in a tank just before the reuse purification step. All the other rinse waters on the plating process line are counter flow, and the last one is the cleanest. The most concentrated rinse water will first flow to a collection tank before circulating through the metals recovery system. The drag out and post-plating ones (less concentrated) will flow through the precious metal recovery module first and then to the collection tank. All flowing rinse waters can be set up to circulate constantly or based upon its conductivity. The reuse collection tank should contain a level sensor that will trigger a pump to add city water to the tank when the level drops. This setup helps to maintain fresh water levels in the systems that is lost due to the evaporation and spillage.

Benefits of platinum recovery and water reuse

  • Better rinsing (higher purity)
  • Fewer rejects
  • Decreased amount of water purchased
  • Decreased amount of water discharged
  • Decrease in F006 waste
  • Increased precious metal recovery

ProChem strives to help their customers establish the highest level of credibility and a positive reputation within the regulatory community. Their goal is to significantly reduce the amount of fresh water that manufacturers require by providing sustainable solutions that will also benefit the customer’s bottom line.